Activity/passivity theme refers to a debate among developmental theorists about whether children are active contributors to their own development or, rather, passive recipients of environmental influence. Activity/passivity theme is also called Activity/passivity issue

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Activity/passivity issue at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■■■
Activity/passivity issue is the debate among developmental theorists about whether children are active . . . Read More
Discontinuity of development at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
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Nature versus Nurture debate at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
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Mechanistic model at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
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Ecological systems theory at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
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Developmental-versus-difference controversy at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
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Continuity-discontinuity controversy at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
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Prospective studies at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
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