Glossary W

Walter Cannon applied the concept of Homeostasis to the study of human interactions with the environment. Specifically, Cannon studied how stressors affect the sympathetic nervous system (SNS).

Wangle means to achieve something by scheming or manipulating.

Waxy flexibility refers to the semi-stiff quality of poses or postures made by a person with Catatonic-type schizophrenia.

Ways of Coping refers to a measurement for coping strategies (Folkman & Lazarus, 1980). The Ways of Coping was developed by Folkman, Lazarus, and their associates (Folkman, Lazarus, Dunkel-Schetter, DeLongis, & Gruen, 1986). 

A Web of Causation is an epidemiologic model showing the complex interaction of risk factors associated with the development of chronic degenerative diseases.

Wechsler adult intelligence scale (WAIS) refers to an individually administered measure of intelligence, intended for adults aged 16-89. The WAIS is intended to measure human intelligence reflected in both verbal and performance abilities. Dr. David Wechsler, a clinical psychologist , who authored the test believed that intelligence is a global construct , reflecting a variety of measurable skills and should be considered in the context of the overall personality. The WAIS is also administered as part of a test battery to make inferences about personality and pathology.

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) refers to an individually administered measure of intelligence intended for children aged six (6) years to 16 years and 11 months. The WISC is designed to measure human intelligence as reflected in both verbal and non-verbal (performance) abilities. David Wechsler, the author of the test , believed that intelligence has a global quality that reflects a variety of measurable skills. He also thought that it should be considered in the context of the person's overall personality. The WISC is used in schools as part of placement evaluations for programs for gifted children and for children who are developmentally disabled.

Wellness refers to a dynamic state of physical, mental, and social well-being; a way of life that equips the individual to realise the full potential of their capabilities and to compensate for and overcome weaknesses. Wellness is a lifestyle that recognises the importance of self -responsibility, physical fitness , nutrition and stress reduction.

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