Dissipative system refers to a system that takes on and dissipates energy as it interacts with its environment. The term itself expresses a paradox, because dissipative suggests falling apart or chaos, while structure suggests organization and order. Dissipative systems are those which are able to maintain identity only because they are open to flows of energy, matter, or information from their environments.

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