Isokinetic is defined as an action in which the rate of movement is constantly maintained through a specific range of motion even though maximal force is exerted. It is a type of dynamic exercise often using concentric and/or eccentric muscle contractions in which the speed (or velocity) of movement is constant and muscular contraction (often maximal contraction) occurs throughout the movement.

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