Phi phenomenon refers to the Illusion that a light is moving from one location to another. The Phi phenomenon is caused by flashing two (2) lights on and off at a certain rate.

Mor eover, Phi phenomenon is a tendency to see something as moving back and forth between positions, when in fact it is alternately blinking on and off in those positions.

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