Chronic illness refers to a type of illness that is long lasting, permanent or long-term and often irreversible; illnesses that persist over long periods of time, such as diabetes or arthritis that often results in some type of disability and which may require a person to seek help with various activities.
Other /More definition:
chronic illness is an illness that is long lasting and often irreversible.

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