Interference is the tendency for new memories to impair retrieval of older memories, and the reverse. Interference occurs when competing information causes an individual to forget something. Moreover, Interference is a hypothesized process of forgetting in which material is thought to be buried or otherwise displaced by other information but still exists somewhere in a memory store.

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