Passive euthanasia means allowing a person to die by withholding an available treatment; allowing someone to die by either not doing that is withholding or omitting/withdrawing some action that is necessary to sustain life. It means withholding treatment or removing life-sustaining nourishment and breathing aids for the dying person, with the result that death occurs more quickly than if these procedures were continued.

Related Articles

Euthanasia at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Euthanasia refers to an act or practice of causing death painlessly in order to end suffering: advocated . . . Read More
Active euthanasia at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
Active euthanasia involves the deliberate ending of a person’s life through an intervention or action . . . Read More
Project Life Cycle at environment-database.eu■■■■
The Project Life Cycle is the sequence of major events in a process, such as systematic planning, development . . . Read More
Suicidal at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Suicidal refers to verbal statement(s) indicating that suicide is being considered; - - Suicide is a . . . Read More
Assisted suicide at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Assisted suicide refers to suicide committed with the assistance of a physician by a person terminally . . . Read More
Living will at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Living will refers to a will prepared by a person with a terminal illness , requesting that extraordinary . . . Read More
Extraordinary means of treatment at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Extraordinary means of treatment: Extraordinary means of treatment refer to interventions to sustain . . . Read More
Death darers at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Death darers are individuals who are ambivalent about dying and take actions that increase their chances . . . Read More
Determination at quality-database.eu■■■
- In quality management, determination refers to the process of making a decision or taking action based . . . Read More
Heroic Medicine at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Heroic Medicine denotes an aggressive, daring procedure in a dangerously ill patient which in itself . . . Read More