Productive thinking is thinking that involves insights that go beyond the bounds of existing associations. According to Wertheimer, Productive thinking is the type of thinking that ponders principles rather than isolated facts and that aims at understanding the solutions to problems rather than memorizing a certain problem-solving strategy or logical rules.

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