Palliative care refers to the care of patients whose disease is no longer curable, example of these diseases are cancer , HIV/Aids, and motor-neurone disease. It takes into account the phys ical, psychological, social and spiritual aspects of care of patients, with the aim of providing the best quality of life for them. Palliative care was developed by and is still largely provided by voluntary hospices.

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