Analog model refers to the approach to research that employs subjects who are similar to clinical clients, allowing replication of a clinical problem under controlled conditions .
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Analog model refers to an approach to research that employs subjects who are similar to clinical clients, allowing replication of a clinical problem under controlled conditions.

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