Behavioral confirmation is a type of self -fulfilling prophecy whereby people's social expectations lead them to act in ways that cause others to confirm their expectations.
Other /More definition:
Behavioral confirmation refers to the process by which people behave in ways that elicit from others specific expected reactions and then use those reactions to confirm their beliefs.

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