Babbling refers to the infant''s preferential production largely of those distinct phonemes - both vowels and consonant which are characteristic of the infant's own language .

It is the child's first vocalizations that have the sounds of speech ; a speech-like sounds that consist of vowel-consonant combinations which is common with infants at about 6 months Moreover, it refer to the vocal sounds of infants after about the sixth week that are initially characterized by sounds used in many languages and then begin to reflect the sounds and intonation infants are most likely to hear in their caregivers ' speech.

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