Hostile attribution bias refers to a tendency to assume that provocation is intentional. It is the tendency to perceive ambiguous actions by others as aggressive; tendency to view harm done under ambiguous circumstances as having stemmed from a hostile intent on the part of the harmdoer; characterizes reactive aggressors. Hostile attribution bias, moreover, is the tendency of aggressive children to attribute negative intent to others, especially when the intentions of another child are unclear

Related Articles

Correspondence bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
Correspondence bias refers to the the tendency to assume that people’s actions and words reflect their . . . Read More
Hostile perception bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
. . . Read More
Hostile attributional bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Hostile attributional bias: hostile attributional bias refers to the tendency of aggressive children . . . Read More
Hostile expectation bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Hostile expectation bias refers to the tendency to assume that people will react to potential conflicts . . . Read More
Omission bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Omission bias refers to the tendency to take whatever course of action does not require you to do anything . . . Read More
Interpretative bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Interpretative bias refers to the tendency to interpret ambiguous situations in a negative or threatening . . . Read More
Relationship superiority bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Relationship superiority bias refers to a tendency to assume that one's own romantic relationship is . . . Read More
Outgroup homogeneity bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Outgroup homogeneity bias refers to a tendency to underestimate the variability among outgroup members; . . . Read More
Actor/observer bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Actor/observer bias refers to the tendency for actors to make external attributions and observers to . . . Read More
Defensive bias at psychology-glossary.com■■■
Defensive bias the tendency for people to perceive themselves as personally and situationally similar . . . Read More