Linguistic relativity is defined as the assertion that speakers of different languages have differing cognitive systems and that these different cognitive systems influence the ways in which people speaking the various languages think about the world. Linguistic relativity is the hypothesis that the cognitive processes determined by language vary from language to language.

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