Transfer refers to any carryover of knowledge or skills from one problem situation to another.

In psychology, transfer refers to the ability to apply knowledge, skills, or strategies learned in one situation to a new situation. Transfer can be positive, when previous learning facilitates performance on a new task, or negative, when previous learning interferes with performance on a new task. Here are some examples of the use of transfer in psychology:

  1. Skill transfer: A person who learns to play the guitar may be able to transfer their knowledge and skills to another stringed instrument, such as the ukulele. This is an example of positive transfer, where previous learning facilitates the learning of a new skill.

  2. Conceptual transfer: A person who learns about basic principles of math, such as addition and subtraction, may be able to transfer these concepts to more complex math problems, such as multiplication and division. This is an example of positive transfer, where previous learning facilitates the application of knowledge to new situations.

  3. Negative transfer: A person who learns to play soccer with a specific set of rules may find it difficult to adapt to playing soccer with slightly different rules. This is an example of negative transfer, where previous learning interferes with the ability to perform on a new task.

  4. Near transfer: A person who learns to solve a specific type of problem in one context may be able to transfer this knowledge to solve similar problems in a similar context. This is an example of near transfer, where previous learning facilitates performance on a similar task.

  5. Far transfer: A person who learns to solve a specific type of problem in one context may find it difficult to transfer this knowledge to solve problems in a different context. This is an example of far transfer, where previous learning does not facilitate performance on a new task in a different context.

Overall, transfer is an important concept in psychology as it helps to explain how learning can be applied to new situations and contexts. Understanding the mechanisms of transfer can also help educators and trainers to design more effective learning programs.