Biological forces refer to one of four (4) basic forces of development that include all genetic and health -related factors. Biological forces not only include examples as Prenatal development, brain maturation, puberty, menopause, carviovascular functioning, etc. , but also include the effects of lifestyle factors, such as diet and exercise. Biological forces therefore can be viewed as providing the raw material necessary for development.

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