Disorganized type of schizophrenia refers to the type of Schizophrenia featuring disrupted speech and behavior, disjointed delusions and hallucinations, and silly or flat affect.


Other definition:
Disorganized type of schizophrenia refers to a type of Schizophrenia featuring disrupted speech and behavior, disjointed/fragmented delusions and hallucinations, and silly or flat affect.

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