Dorsal stream is defined as the visual path in the parietal cortex which is sometimes known as the "where" or "how" pathway.

In the psychology context, the dorsal stream is a pathway of visual processing that runs from the occipital cortex (the primary visual processing area in the brain) to the parietal cortex (which is involved in spatial perception and attention).

The dorsal stream is responsible for processing information related to the location, movement, and spatial relationships of objects in the visual field. This pathway is sometimes referred to as the "where" or "how" pathway, because it helps us to identify where objects are located in space and how they are moving.

Here are some examples of how the dorsal stream is involved in visual processing:

  1. Catching a ball: When we catch a ball, the dorsal stream is responsible for processing the trajectory of the ball and the movement of our own hand, in order to coordinate the two and successfully catch the ball.

  2. Navigating a space: The dorsal stream is involved in our ability to navigate through a physical environment, by processing the spatial relationships between objects and landmarks.

  3. Reading a map: When we read a map, the dorsal stream helps us to understand the spatial relationships between different locations, by processing the shapes and positions of the various landmarks and routes.

  4. Driving a car: The dorsal stream is involved in our ability to drive a car, by processing the spatial relationships between other cars, pedestrians, and the road itself.

Overall, the dorsal stream is an important pathway of visual processing that helps us to understand the spatial relationships between objects in our environment, and to navigate and interact with that environment in a meaningful way.