Games is a term used in industrial and organizational psychology that refers to an absenteeism control method in which games such as poker and bingo are used to reward employee attendance.


Other /More definition:
Games refers to manipulative interactions progressing toward a predictable outcome, in which people conceal their real motivations.

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