Self -fulfilling prophecy refers to the tendency for our expectations to evoke responses that confirm what we originally anticipated. They are cases whereby people (a) have an expectation about what another person is like, which (b) influences how they act toward that person, which (c) causes that person to behave in a way consistent with people's original expectations

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