A case can refer to a specific individual or group who is being studied or treated. For example, a psychologist might work with a single patient on a one-on-one basis, in which case that patient would be referred to as a "case." Similarly, a group of patients being treated in a group therapy setting might be referred to as a "case group."

In research, the term "case" might also be used to refer to a specific instance or example of a phenomenon being studied. For example, a researcher might study a particular case of depression or anxiety in order to better understand the causes and treatment of these conditions.

Overall, the concept of "case" is often used in psychology to refer to a specific individual or group being studied or treated, and to describe the specific characteristics and circumstances of that individual or group.

Some examples where this term is used:

  • A psychologist might work with a single patient on a one-on-one basis, in which case that patient would be referred to as a "case." The psychologist might collect data about the patient's symptoms, history, and treatment progress, and use this information to develop a treatment plan and track the patient's progress over time.
  • A group of patients being treated in a group therapy setting might be referred to as a "case group." The psychologist might observe and collect data about the interactions and dynamics within the group in order to better understand the group's collective experience and progress.
  • A researcher might study a particular case of depression or anxiety in order to better understand the causes and treatment of these conditions. The researcher might collect data about the patient's symptoms, medical history, and other relevant factors in order to identify patterns and develop insights about the condition.
  • A case study is a research method in which a single individual or group is studied in depth in order to better understand a particular phenomenon or condition. Case studies can be used to explore a wide range of topics in psychology, including personality, development, and mental health disorders.

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