Similarity index (Concordance rate ) refers to an index of similarity between individuals. Concordance rate is the percentage of cases in which a particular attribute is present for one member of a twin pair if it is present for the other.

The simplest form of Concordance rate or Similarity index is the percentage of instances in which two (2) individuals exhibit similar behaviors or characteristics.

Related Articles

Matching at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
Matching: Matching is one term in connection with experiments that refers to the procedure whereby pairs . . . Read More
Concordance rate at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Concordance rate: Concordance rate refers to agreement ratios between people diagnosed as having a particular . . . Read More
Physical attractiveness at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
Physical attractiveness: Physical attractiveness is the perception of the physical traits of an individual . . . Read More
Crowd at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
Crowd: Crowd refers to a large, loosely organized, reputationally based peer group made up of individuals . . . Read More
Direct effect at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
Direct effect: Direct effect refer to instances in which any pair of family members affects and is affected . . . Read More
False uniqueness effect at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
False uniqueness effect: False uniqueness effect refers to - the tendency to underestimate the commonality . . . Read More
EE (Expressed Emotion) at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
- EE (Expressed Emotion) : - EE (Expressed Emotion ) : EE otherwise known as Expressed emotion refers . . . Read More
Physical-attractiveness stereotype at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Physical-attractiveness stereotype: Physical-attractiveness stereotype is the presumption that physically . . . Read More
Gender at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Gender: Gender refers to the socially constructed roles, behaviors , activities, and attributes that . . . Read More
Androgyny at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Androgyny: Androgyny refers to the possession of both “female” and “male” gender-role characteristics. . . . Read More