Vulnerability refers to susceptibility or tendency to develop a physical or mental disorder.

In psychology, vulnerability refers to the openness or susceptibility to physical, emotional, or social harm or injury. Vulnerability can be a normal and natural part of being human, and can be experienced in many different ways, such as feeling emotionally exposed or sensitive, being physically vulnerable to illness or injury, or being at risk of social or economic harm.

Vulnerability can also be a source of strength, as it can allow people to connect with others, to be open to new experiences and learning, and to be more authentic and genuine in their relationships.

Here are some examples of vulnerability in psychology:

  • A person feels emotionally vulnerable after experiencing a loss or a traumatic event and finds it difficult to open up to others.

  • A person feels physically vulnerable due to a chronic illness or disability, and may worry about their ability to care for themselves or participate in activities.

  • A person feels socially vulnerable due to their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other aspect of their identity, and may worry about discrimination or mistreatment.

  • A person shares their feelings or experiences with others, even though it makes them feel vulnerable, in order to build closer relationships or to support others who are going through similar experiences.

Vulnerability can be a challenging and uncomfortable experience, but it can also be an opportunity for growth and connection.

Related Articles

Intimacy at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■■
Intimacy refers to the connection to another person characterized by mutual caring, openness, self -disclosure, . . . Read More
Diathesis-stress model at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■■
Diathesis-stress model refers to a theory of stress that suggests that some individuals are vulnerable . . . Read More
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■■
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is defined as Anxiety disorder which is characterized by the following:(1) . . . Read More
Pseudomutuality at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■
Pseudomutuality refers to presentation of an appearance of open relationships in a family so as to conceal . . . Read More
Attachment theory at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■
Attachment theory refers to a view that the ability and need to form an attachment relationship early . . . Read More
Need for affiliation at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■
Need for affiliation refers to the dispositional tendency to seek out othersthe extent to which a person . . . Read More
Attribute at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■
Attribute is a characteristic of a person or a thing In psychology, an attribute is a characteristic . . . Read More
Mutuality at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
Mutuality is the ability of two (2) people to meet each other's needs and to share each other's concerns . . . Read More
Activities of daily living at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
Activities of daily living (ADLs) refers to self-help tasks such as bathing, dressing, and using the . . . Read More
Generalized anxiety disorder at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
The Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) refers to an excessive or unrealistic worry that is unrelated . . . Read More