Anal stage refers to Freud’s second psychosexual stage (ages 12 or 18 months to three years), in which the child derives sensual pleasure mainly from expelling and withholding feces. It is Freudian stage of development from ages 1-3. During this stage the child's focus of pleasure is the anus. There is a conflict between the child's desire to expel feces and the parents' attempt to toilet train the child.

Anal stage (1-3 yrs)
The anal stage follows the oral stage and is primarily concerned with the child's toilet training. During this stage, the focus of pleasure is on the anus (thus the "anal stage"). The child gets pleasure from expelling feces, but this comes into conflict with the parents, who want the child to expel feces only when it is appropriate. Thus the child's major challenge during this period is to learn self-control so that these two conflicting forces can be reconciled. A child who fixates at this stage will later become obsessed with control. This may lead either to undercontrol (excessive messiness, generosity, etc.) or overcontrol (excessive neatness, stinginess, etc.)--the classic "anal retentiveness."
Other definition:
Anal stage refers to a period of psychosexual Development in which the child's pleasure focuses on anal stimulation from holding onto and expelling feces.
Other /More definition:
anal stage refers to Freud"s second psychosexual stage (ages 12 or 18 months to three years), in which the child derives sensual pleasure mainly from expelling and withholding feces. It is Freudian stage of development from ages 1-3. During this stage the child's focus of pleasure is the anus. There is a conflict between the child's desire to expel feces and the parents' attempt to toilet train the child.

Anal stage (1-3 yrs)
The anal stage follows the oral stage and is primarily concerned with the child's toilet training. During this stage, the focus of pleasure is on the anus (thus the "anal stage"). The child gets pleasure from expelling feces, but this comes into conflict with the parents, who want the child to expel feces only when it is appropriate. Thus the child's major challenge during this period is to learn self-control so that these two conflicting forces can be reconciled. A child who fixates at this stage will later become obsessed with control. This may lead either to undercontrol (excessive messiness, generosity, etc.) or overcontrol (excessive neatness, stinginess, etc.)--the classic "anal retentiveness."
List of books: Anal,stage

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