Cultural Compatibility Hypothesis refer to the hypothesis that treatment is likely to be more effective when compatible with the cultural patterns of the child (patient) and family.
Other /More definition:
Cultural compatibility hypothesis refers to the hypothesis that treatment is likely to be more effective when compatible with the cultural patterns of the child and family.

Related Articles

Family History at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■
Family History refers to the information obtained from the parents of a specific client (child/patient) . . . Read More
Scope at top500.de■■■■
Scope: A telescopic sight, commonly called a scope, is a sighting device that is based on an optical . . . Read More
Acceptance at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Acceptance, in spirituality, mindfulness, and human psychology, usually refers to the experience of a . . . Read More
Psychosocial approach at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
psychosocial approach refers to the treatment practice that focuses on social and cultural factors, such . . . Read More
Developmental History at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Developmental History refers to the information obtained from the parents of a specific client (child/patient) . . . Read More
Language bioprogram hypothesis at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Language bioprogram hypothesis refers to the hypothesis that children whose environmental exposure to . . . Read More
Fragile X syndrome at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
fragile X syndrome refers to the pattern of abnormality caused by a defect in the X chromosome resulting . . . Read More
Regression at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Regression refers to the reversion to an earlier stage of development in the face of unacceptable impulses. . . . Read More
Microsystem at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Microsystem is defined as the immediate settings with which the child interacts, such as the home, the . . . Read More
Cognitive neuropsychology at psychology-glossary.com■■■■
Cognitive neuropsychology : Cognitive neuropsychology refers to one of the four (4) approaches in the . . . Read More