Deductive validity refers to a property of some logical arguments such that it is impossible for the premises to be true and the conclusion(s) to be false. It also means logical soundness.

In the psychology context, deductive validity refers to the logical correctness of an argument in which the conclusion necessarily follows from the premises. It is a type of reasoning used in research studies, experimental designs, and hypothesis testing.

A deductively valid argument is one in which the conclusion is true if the premises are true. It is the opposite of inductive reasoning, in which the conclusion is supported by evidence but may not necessarily be true.

Here are a few examples to help illustrate deductive validity:

Example 1:

  • Premise 1: All men are mortal.
  • Premise 2: Socrates is a man.
  • Conclusion: Therefore, Socrates is mortal.

This is a valid deductive argument because the conclusion follows logically from the premises.

Example 2:

  • Premise 1: All dogs have fur.
  • Premise 2: This animal has fur.
  • Conclusion: Therefore, this animal is a dog.

This argument is not valid because the conclusion does not necessarily follow from the premises.

Example 3:

  • Premise 1: If it rains, the ground will be wet.
  • Premise 2: It is raining.
  • Conclusion: Therefore, the ground is wet.

This argument is valid because the conclusion follows logically from the premises.

Related Articles

Inductive strength at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■■■
Inductive strength refers to a property of some logical arguments such that it is improbable but not . . . Read More
Nonequivalent at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■■
Nonequivalent in the psychology context refers to groups or conditions that are not identical in terms . . . Read More
Falsification at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
Falsification refers to a form of deception that creates a fictiona lie In the psychology context, falsification . . . Read More
Premise at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
Premise refers to a statement, from which others are inferred, that helps establish what is already known . . . Read More
Inference at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Inference is defined as a conclusion arrived at by generalizing from data or reasoning from evidence. . . . Read More
Abstract Reasoning at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
In the psychology context, abstract reasoning refers to the cognitive process involved in understanding . . . Read More
Experimental Condition at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Experimental Condition: Experimental condition in the psychology context refers to the specific environment, . . . Read More
Equivalence at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
In the psychology context, equivalence refers to the concept of ensuring that psychological measures, . . . Read More
Independant Variable at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Independant Variable: Independent variable in the psychology context refers to the variable that is manipulated . . . Read More
Experimentation at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Experimentation in the Psychology Context: Understanding, Examples, and the Pursuit of KnowledgeExperimentation . . . Read More