False-belief task refers to a type of task used in theory-of-mind studies, in which the child must infer that another person does not possess knowledge that he or she possesses, that is, that other person holds a belief that is false. Moreover, False-belief task is defined as a method of assessing one’s understanding that people can hold inaccurate beliefs that can influence their conduct, wrong as these beliefs may be

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