Mood refers to a low-intensity, long-lasting emotional state ; an enduring period of emotionality; a feeling state that is not clearly linked to some event.

Likewise, Moods are pers on's experience of emotion which are typically longer lasting and less intense than emotions
Other /More definition:
mood refers to enduring period of emotionality.

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