Deutsch: Alltagsrealismus / Español: Realismo mundano / Português: Realismo mundano / Français: Réalisme banal / Italiano: Realismo mondano /

Mundane realism is a degree to which an experiment is superficially similar to everyday situations.

In psychology, "mundane realism" refers to the extent to which an individual's beliefs or perceptions match up with the actual physical characteristics of the environment. Mundane realism is often used in research on social cognition and refers to the idea that people's beliefs and perceptions are shaped by the physical characteristics of the environment in which they live. Here are a few examples of how "mundane realism" might be used in the field of psychology:

  1. Mundane realism and social cognition: Research on mundane realism often focuses on how people's beliefs and perceptions are influenced by the physical characteristics of their environment. For example, people who live in a highly crowded environment may be more likely to perceive others as unfriendly or uncooperative, compared to those who live in a less crowded environment.

  2. Mundane realism and cultural differences: Mundane realism may also be influenced by cultural differences, as people from different cultures may have different beliefs and expectations about the physical characteristics of their environment.

  3. Mundane realism and social interaction: Research on mundane realism has also explored how people's beliefs and perceptions about the physical characteristics of their environment can influence their social interactions. For example, people who perceive their environment as being highly crowded may be more likely to avoid social interaction, while those who perceive their environment as less crowded may be more likely to seek out social interaction.

  4. Mundane realism and mental health: Research on mundane realism has also explored how people's beliefs and perceptions about the physical characteristics of their environment may be related to their mental health. For example, people who perceive their environment as being highly chaotic or stressful may be more likely to experience mental health issues, such as anxiety or depression.

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