Protein hormone is hormone composed of a long chain of amino acids.

In the psychology context, protein hormones refer to the class of hormones that are made up of proteins or peptides. These hormones are secreted by glands, such as the pituitary gland or the pancreas, and are transported in the bloodstream to target organs where they bind to specific receptors and trigger physiological responses.

Examples of protein hormones include:

  1. Insulin: Secreted by the pancreas, insulin regulates glucose metabolism and is important for maintaining blood sugar levels.

  2. Growth hormone: Secreted by the pituitary gland, growth hormone stimulates growth and cell reproduction in humans and other animals.

  3. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH): Secreted by the pituitary gland, FSH is important for regulating the menstrual cycle in women and sperm production in men.

  4. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH): Secreted by the pituitary gland, TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolism.

  5. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH): Secreted by the pituitary gland, ACTH stimulates the adrenal glands to produce cortisol, which is important for regulating stress responses.

Protein hormones play a critical role in regulating many physiological processes, including growth and development, metabolism, and reproductive functions. Dysfunction in the production or regulation of protein hormones can lead to a range of health conditions, including diabetes, growth disorders, and hormonal imbalances.

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