Prefrontal Lobotomy refers to a type of Psychosurgery in which the frontal lobes of the brain are severed from the lower centers of the brain in people suffering from Psychosis. Prefrontal Lobotomy, moreover, is an operation that severs the nerve fibers that connect the brain's frontal lobe to the thalamus which is performed on individuals with severe mental disorders that have not responded to other treatments.

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