Deutsch: Verhaltensassimilation / Español: Asimilación conductual / Português: Assimilação comportamental / Français: Assimilation comportementale / Italiano: Assimilazione comportamentale /

Behavioral assimilation refers to the eventual matching of the behaviors displayed by cooperating or competing group members.

Behavioral assimilation refers to the phenomenon in which individuals adjust their behavior to match that of the people around them. This can occur consciously or unconsciously, and it can happen in a variety of contexts. Here are some examples of behavioral assimilation:

  1. Accent: When people move to a new area, they may unconsciously adopt the accent of the people around them. This can happen even if the person is not consciously trying to do so.

  2. Dress: People often dress in a way that is similar to those around them. For example, if someone is going to a formal event, they may dress more formally than usual, even if they wouldn't typically wear such attire.

  3. Mannerisms: People may unconsciously adopt the mannerisms of those around them. For example, if someone is hanging out with a group of friends who all use a particular slang term, they may start to use that term as well.

  4. Social norms: People tend to conform to social norms, which are unwritten rules about how people should behave in certain situations. For example, people may stand in line even if there is no signage or directive because it is the social norm.

  5. Eating habits: People may adopt the eating habits of those around them. For example, if someone is in a group of people who are all vegetarian, they may choose a vegetarian meal even if they are not typically a vegetarian.

  6. Exercise habits: People may adopt the exercise habits of those around them. For example, if someone is in a group of people who all go for a run every morning, they may start to do the same.

Overall, behavioral assimilation is a common phenomenon in which people adjust their behavior to match those around them. This can happen in a variety of contexts and can occur consciously or unconsciously.