- Cardiovascular reactivity (CVR) : Cardiovascular reactivity (CVR refers to an increase in blood pressure and heart rate as a reaction to frustration or harassment; changes in heart rate and blood pressure in response to stress . Reactivity varies greatly between individuals and is a key physiological risk factor for the development of Cardiovascular disease.

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