Dominance refers to hand and to a lesser extent, eye and foot preferences and proficiencies in performing tasks or to the cerebral organization of the brain.

In psychology, dominance refers to the degree to which an individual is able to exert control or influence over others. Dominance can manifest in a variety of contexts, including social, cultural, and organizational settings.

Examples of dominance in psychology include:

  1. Social dominance: In a social group, some individuals may be more dominant than others in terms of their ability to control and influence the group's behavior. This may be due to factors such as physical strength, social status, or charisma.

  2. Sexual dominance: In sexual relationships, dominance can refer to the degree to which one partner is able to exert control over the other partner's behavior, desires, or sexual expression.

  3. Cultural dominance: In many societies, certain groups may be more dominant than others in terms of their ability to control or influence the cultural norms, values, and practices of that society.

  4. Organizational dominance: In the workplace, some individuals or groups may be more dominant than others in terms of their ability to control decision-making processes or influence organizational policies.

  5. Psychological dominance: In interpersonal relationships, one individual may be more dominant than the other in terms of their ability to exert influence over the other's thoughts, feelings, or behaviors. This can occur in both positive and negative contexts, such as in the context of a healthy relationship or an abusive relationship.

Overall, dominance can play an important role in many different aspects of psychology, including social dynamics, interpersonal relationships, and organizational behavior.