Deutsch: Indiscriminate Anhaftung / Español: Apego Indiscriminado / Português: Apego Indiscriminado / Français: Attachement Indiscriminé / Italiano: Attaccamento Indiscriminato /

Indiscriminate attachment refers to the display of attachment behaviors toward any person.

In psychology, "indiscriminate attachment" refers to the tendency of an individual to form attachments to any available caregiver or source of support, regardless of the quality of the attachment or the suitability of the caregiver as a source of support. Indiscriminate attachment is typically associated with infants or young children who are not yet able to distinguish between caregivers who are nurturing and supportive and those who are neglectful or abusive.

Indiscriminate attachment can be contrasted with "secure attachment," which refers to the development of a close and trusting bond with a caregiver that allows an individual to feel safe and secure. Secure attachment is typically associated with caregivers who are responsive and nurturing and who provide a supportive and consistent environment for the child.

For example, an infant who forms an indiscriminate attachment might show the same level of attachment to a caregiver who is neglectful or abusive as they do to a caregiver who is nurturing and supportive. In contrast, an infant with a secure attachment might show a close and trusting bond with a caregiver who is responsive and nurturing, and may be more distressed when separated from that caregiver.

Overall, "indiscriminate attachment" refers to the tendency of an individual to form attachments to any available caregiver or source of support, regardless of the quality of the attachment or the suitability of the caregiver as a source of support. It is typically associated with infants or young children who are not yet able to distinguish between caregivers who are nurturing and supportive and those who are neglectful or abusive.

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