Incidental training refers to a method of teaching readiness skills or other desired behaviors that works to strengthen the Behavior by capitalizing on naturally occurring opportunit ies.
Other /More definition:
incidental training refers to a method of teaching readiness skills or other desired behaviors that works to strengthen the behavior by capitalizing on naturally occurring opportunities.

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