Psychoanalytic theory refers to Freudian theory of personality that emphasizes unconscious forces and conflicts. In criminology, Psychoanalytic theory is a theory of criminality that attributes delinquent and criminal behavior to a conscience that is either so overbearing that it arouses excessive feelings of guilt or so weak that it cannot control the individual's impulses.

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