Deutsch: Sozialorientierungstheorie / Español: Teoría de la orientación social / Português: Teoria da orientação social / Français: Théorie de l'orientation sociale / Italiano: Teoria dell'orientamento sociale /

Social orientation theory refers to an analysis of performance gains in groups suggesting individual differences in social (the tendency to approach social situations apprehensively or with enthusiasm) orientation predict when social facilitation will occur.

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