Own-sex schema refer to detailed knowledge or plans of action that enable a person to perform gender-consistent activities and to enact his/her gender role.

In psychology, the own-sex schema refers to the tendency of individuals to process and remember information more easily when it relates to their own gender. This bias can affect a range of cognitive processes, including perception, memory, and attention. Here are some examples of the own-sex schema:

  1. Stereotyping: Individuals may be more likely to stereotype others based on gender, assuming that individuals of their own gender possess certain traits or characteristics. For example, a man may assume that all women are emotional and irrational, while a woman may assume that all men are aggressive and competitive.

  2. Memory biases: Individuals may be more likely to remember information that is relevant to their own gender. For example, women may remember more information about female characters in a book, while men may remember more information about male characters.

  3. Attentional biases: Individuals may be more likely to attend to information that is relevant to their own gender. For example, a man may be more likely to notice other men in a crowded room, while a woman may be more likely to notice other women.

  4. Social comparison: Individuals may be more likely to compare themselves to others of their own gender. For example, a woman may compare her appearance to that of other women, while a man may compare his athletic abilities to those of other men.

  5. Career choice: Individuals may be more likely to choose careers that are stereotypically associated with their own gender. For example, women may be more likely to choose careers in nursing or teaching, while men may be more likely to choose careers in engineering or computer science.

Overall, the own-sex schema can influence a wide range of cognitive processes and social behaviors. It is important for individuals to be aware of this bias and to strive to overcome it in order to reduce gender stereotypes and promote greater equality.

 

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