Stereotype refers to a generalization about a group of people in which identical characteristics are assigned to virtually all members of the group, regardless of actual variation among the members.

In psychology, a stereotype refers to a widely held belief or perception about a group of people, based on their membership in a particular social category. Stereotypes can be positive or negative, and can be based on a variety of characteristics such as race, gender, age, sexual orientation, and social class. Here are some examples of stereotypes:

  1. Gender stereotypes: Gender stereotypes are beliefs or perceptions about the roles and characteristics of men and women. For example, the stereotype that women are emotional and nurturing, while men are aggressive and dominant.

  2. Racial stereotypes: Racial stereotypes are beliefs or perceptions about the characteristics and behaviors of people from different racial groups. For example, the stereotype that African Americans are more athletic and have natural rhythm, while Asians are good at math and science.

  3. Age stereotypes: Age stereotypes are beliefs or perceptions about the abilities and characteristics of people of different ages. For example, the stereotype that older people are less capable and less productive than younger people.

  4. Occupational stereotypes: Occupational stereotypes are beliefs or perceptions about the characteristics and abilities of people in different professions. For example, the stereotype that doctors are intelligent and well-educated, while construction workers are less educated and more physically oriented.

  5. Sexual orientation stereotypes: Sexual orientation stereotypes are beliefs or perceptions about the characteristics and behaviors of people based on their sexual orientation. For example, the stereotype that gay men are more effeminate and promiscuous than heterosexual men.

Stereotypes can be harmful and can lead to discrimination and prejudice against individuals based on their membership in a particular social category. By understanding the nature and effects of stereotypes, psychologists can develop interventions to reduce prejudice and promote more positive and inclusive attitudes towards people from diverse backgrounds.

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