Alfred Binet (1857 - 1911) was both a psychologist and a lawyer. His greatest accomplishment in the field of psychology lead to what we now call the Intelligence Quotient or IQ. As a member of the French commission investigating educational concerns, developed a test to measure the "mental age " (MA) of children entering school.

Mental age refers to the child's current ability compared to other children of different ages. In other words, if a child responded to questions at about the same correctness as an eight year old, the child would be said to have a mental age of eight. Binet's test is considered the first intelligence test, although the concept of mental age was revised twice before becoming the foundation of IQ testing. In 1914, three years after Binet's death, a German Psychologist, William Stern, proposed that by dividing the mental age of a child by his or her chronological age (CA), we could provide an easy to understand 'Intelligence Quotient.' It was again revised by Lewis Terman, from Stanford University, who expanded the test for American subjects and multiplied the Stern formula by 100. This lead to the statistical definition of Intelligence: IQ=MA/CA*100. The test was later renamed the Stanford-Binet Intelligence test as it is known as today.


Other definition

Alfred Binet (1857-1911) founded the following Galton's methods of measuring intelligence usually resulted in falsely concluding that deaf and blind children had low intelligence. Binet attempted to measure directly the cognitive abilities he thought constituted intelligence.

Related Articles

IQ-Test at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■
IQ-Test: IQ test, short for , is a standardized assessment designed to measure an individual's cognitive . . . Read More
Preoperation at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■■
Preoperational thinking is a term used in developmental psychology to describe the cognitive stage that . . . Read More
Robert J. Sternberg at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
Robert J. Sternberg is a Cognitive Psychologist who is well-known for his Triarchic Theory of Intelligence. . . . Read More
Score at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■■
Score: In psychology, a score is a numerical value that is assigned to a person based on their performance . . . Read More
Nancy School at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Nancy School refers to a Group of physicians who believed that because all humans are suggestible, all . . . Read More
Graduation at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Graduation can refer to the achievement of completing an educational program, such as high school or . . . Read More
Enfant at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Enfant in the psychology context is a French term that means "child." It is often used in psychology . . . Read More
Recapitulation at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Recapitulation in the psychology context refers to a theory proposed by Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget. . . . Read More
Milestone at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
A Milestone in the psychology context refers to significant and measurable achievements or developmental . . . Read More
Percentile rank at psychology-glossary.com■■■■■■
Percentile rank refers to the proportion of scores that fall below a particular score In psychology, . . . Read More