Domestic Violence is defined as violence within the family or between husband and wife or partners.

Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior in a relationship where one partner seeks to exert power and control over the other. This can occur in intimate partner relationships, family relationships, or other forms of close personal relationships. It can involve physical, sexual, emotional, or financial abuse, as well as stalking or other forms of harassment. Domestic violence is a serious problem that can have long-lasting effects on the victims and their families, including psychological trauma, physical injuries, and even death.

Examples of domestic violence include physical abuse such as hitting, punching, or pushing, sexual abuse such as forced sex or unwanted sexual contact, emotional abuse such as insults, threats, or manipulation, and financial abuse such as controlling money or preventing the victim from working. Stalking is also a common form of domestic violence, which involves repeated unwanted contact or surveillance of the victim.

Similar to domestic violence is intimate partner violence, which is specifically limited to abusive behavior within intimate partner relationships. This type of violence can occur between spouses, boyfriends and girlfriends, same-sex partners, or other types of intimate relationships.

There are also several different types of domestic violence that are commonly recognized in the field of psychology. Physical abuse involves using physical force to harm or intimidate the victim, while sexual abuse involves unwanted sexual contact or activity. Emotional abuse involves using verbal or nonverbal behavior to harm the victim's emotional well-being, such as threats, humiliation, or intimidation. Financial abuse involves controlling the victim's financial resources or preventing them from working or accessing resources.

There are many theories that attempt to explain why domestic violence occurs, including social learning theory, which suggests that individuals learn violent behavior from their family or other social experiences. Other theories include feminist theory, which focuses on the role of patriarchy in perpetuating violence against women, and attachment theory, which suggests that insecure attachment styles may contribute to domestic violence.

Treatment for domestic violence typically involves a combination of individual and group therapy, as well as support and advocacy services for the victim. Couples therapy may also be used to address relationship issues and improve communication skills. Additionally, there are many community resources available to victims of domestic violence, including hotlines, shelters, and legal advocacy services.

In summary, domestic violence is a serious problem that can have long-lasting effects on victims and their families. It can involve physical, sexual, emotional, or financial abuse, as well as stalking or other forms of harassment. There are many theories that attempt to explain why domestic violence occurs, and treatment typically involves a combination of individual and group therapy, as well as community support and advocacy services.