Trend refers to the general direction in which the attitudes, interests, behaviors and actions of a large segment of a population change over time, including fashion trends, fads, and crazes.

In a single-subject research study, a consistent difference in direction and magnitude from one measurement to the next in a series.
Other /More definition:
trend refers to direction of change of a behavior or behaviors

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