Agent refers to the thematic or semantic role corresponding to an individual who performs a given action.

In psychology, an agent is an entity that has the ability to act or make choices, often with intentionality or purpose. Here are some examples of agents in various psychological contexts:

  1. Social Psychology: In social psychology, an agent is often used to describe an individual who is capable of making decisions and taking actions within a social context. For example, researchers may study how agents make decisions in group settings or how they influence others through social influence.

  2. Cognitive Psychology: In cognitive psychology, an agent may refer to the cognitive processes that are responsible for decision-making and action selection. For example, research may focus on how agents perceive and evaluate different options before making a decision.

  3. Developmental Psychology: In developmental psychology, an agent may be used to describe the developing self-awareness of an individual as they begin to understand themselves as actors in the world. For example, children may begin to understand themselves as agents capable of making choices and taking actions around the age of two.

  4. Artificial Intelligence: In the field of artificial intelligence, agents refer to computer programs that are capable of autonomous decision-making and action selection. These agents may be used to simulate human behavior or to automate certain tasks.

  5. Neuroscience: In neuroscience, agents may be used to describe the neural mechanisms that are responsible for decision-making and action selection. For example, researchers may study the brain regions that are involved in planning and executing actions.

In conclusion, an agent in the psychology context refers to an entity that has the ability to act or make choices, often with intentionality or purpose. Examples of agents can be found in various psychological contexts, including social psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuroscience.

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