The term "draft" refers to a preliminary or rough version of a plan, thought, or piece of writing. It is often used as a way to gather and organize one's thoughts, ideas, or experiences before refining them into a more polished form.

Here are some examples of drafts in psychological contexts:

  1. Cognitive draft - A preliminary version of a thought or idea that a person is working on developing and refining in their mind.

  2. Emotional draft - A preliminary version of an emotional response to a particular situation or event, which may change and evolve over time as the individual processes their feelings.

  3. Behavioral draft - A preliminary version of a plan for how to respond to a particular situation or problem, which may be revised and refined as the individual gathers more information or experiences.

  4. Therapeutic draft - A preliminary version of a therapeutic plan for a client, which may be revised and refined as the therapist gathers more information and works with the client to identify their goals and needs.

  5. Writing draft - A preliminary version of a piece of writing, such as an essay, article, or book, which may be revised and refined several times before it is finalized.

  6. Memory draft - A preliminary version of a memory, which may change and evolve over time as the individual reflects on the experience and incorporates new information.

These are just a few examples of the many ways in which the concept of a draft can be used in psychology. The idea of a draft is to provide a way for individuals to gather, organize, and refine their thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and experiences in a way that helps them to better understand and respond to the world around them.

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