Item analysis refers to an assessment of whether each of the items included in a composite measure makes an independent contribution or merely duplicates the contribution of other items in the measure. Moreover, Item analysis is a set of methods used to evaluate test items. The most common techniques involve assessment of item difficulty and item discriminability .

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