Glossary T

Theoretical framework refers to the process of designing intervention by using principles that are grounded in theory.

Theoretical inferences refers to step 3 of the inverted pyramid method of case conceptualization . Requires attempting to tentatively match client themes developed in previous steps of the process to areas of difficulty according to the counselor ’s theoretical orientation. At this step, previously identified symptom constellations are refined to reflect inferences about deeper aspects or causal roots of the client’s difficulties.

Theoretical orientation refers to the system of understanding human functioning and dysfunction applied by the clinician to his or her understanding of client/patient needs. The commonly used traditional theoretical orientations include: behavioral, brief solution-focused, cognitive , cognitive-behavioral, humanistic , and psychodynamic. Others include existential, feminist psychology of women, reality, and gestalt. Theories are often combined to form eclectic or integrative orientations. Moreover, it refers to theoretical framework that a psychologist relies on to conceptualize and treat clients' problems. Examples of such orientations include psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, systems, and eclectic/integrative.

Theoretical perspective refers to an orientation to understanding the causes of human behavior and the treatment of abnormality.

Theoretical terms referr to those terms that are employed to explain empirical observations according to logical positivism ,

Theories of victimization refer to theories that explain the role that victims play in the crimes that happen to them.

Theory refers to an organized set of concepts that explains a phenomenon or set of phenomena.


Other /More definition:

Theory of Change highlights the underlying assumptions , beliefs , and theories about creating change.

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